Visionary Mushroom Art in Ancient Maya Culture

Here is a link to a website with fascinating images of the ancient Maya hallucinogenic mushroom cult. The website is created by Carl de Borhegyi, who writes “The following study was inspired by a theory first proposed by my father, the late Maya archaeologist Dr. Stephan F. de Borhegyi, that hallucinogenic mushroom rituals were a central aspect of Maya religion…” read more-

4 Responses

  1. It was Carl Ruck who said these stones were NOT ‘mushroom’ stones.
    They were for the ball game…and the so called mushroom ‘heads’ were for forming the latex rubber balls for the ball game. There are only a few sizes of heads.
    Sounds true to me.
    Jennifer

    • Dear Jennifer Snyder,

      I’m quite sure it was Dr. Richard Rose who first suggested that rubber balls used in the ritual ballgame, may have been formed or molded from the heads of mushroom stones. I find this theory very unlikely.

      According to testimony recorded in 1554 in the Colonial document entitled El Titulo de Totonicapan, the Quiché Maya revered mushroom stones as symbols of power and rulership, and before them they performed rituals (of blood sacrifice) to pierce and cut up their bodies. (Sachse, 2001, 186).

      The native population of Mesoamerica prior to the arrival of the Spanish considered hallucinatory mushrooms holy and divine– in striking contrast to their modern status throughout much of the Western world as poisonous and dangerous, offensive, and illegal. It is noteworthy that almost four centuries elapsed between Spanish chronicler Fray Sahagun’s description of narcotic mushroom rites and the rediscovery of this cultural phenomenon in the 1930’s.

      The native population of Mesoamerica prior to the arrival of the Spanish considered hallucinatory mushrooms holy and divine– in striking contrast to their modern status throughout much of the Western world as poisonous and dangerous, offensive, and illegal. It is noteworthy that almost four centuries elapsed between Spanish chronicler Fray Sahagun’s description of narcotic mushroom rites and the rediscovery of this cultural phenomenon in the 1930’s.

      The native population of Mesoamerica prior to the arrival of the Spanish considered hallucinatory mushrooms holy and divine– in striking contrast to their modern status throughout much of the Western world as poisonous and dangerous, offensive, and illegal. It is noteworthy that almost four centuries elapsed between Spanish chronicler Fray Sahagun’s description of narcotic mushroom rites and the rediscovery of this cultural phenomenon in the 1930’s.
      For more read BREAKING THE MUSHROOM CODE: Mushroom Religion before Columbus

      Carl de Borhegyi

  2. there has been great ressistance historically and in archeology to accept the use of mushrooms and other hallucinogens in accedemic circles and only now in more recent times is there an acceptance of there use, i think this is where the “rubber ball maker” explination of these mushroom stones stems from or a general ignorance of mystical traditions involving hallucinogens, becuase they are obviously mushrooms, and not some ball making tool, there has been similar disputes with ancient European Cave art, and there connection to mushroom use, i find that the general demonization of these substances leeds to historians and archeologists to ignore what is perfectly obvious

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