New Essay in Tyr – 4: The (Nine) Doors of Perception: Ralph Metzner on the Sixties, Psychedelic Shamanism and the Northern Tradition.

Tyr: 4New essay, in Tyr – 4: The (Nine) Doors of Perception: Ralph Metzner on the Sixties, Psychedelic Shamanism and the Northern Tradition.

You can order a copy of this volume, Tyr 4, with Ralph’s essay, signed, from Green Earth Foundation, for $25.

The annual monograph series Tyr contains the above 20-page essay interview with Ralph written by Carl Abrahamsson and Joshua Buckley in its vol 4.

Although Tyr presents itself as a kind of journal – it is actually a 430 page book, no. 4 of a series named after the mythic Norse deity Tyr, who was the upholder of the traditional ways of knowledge the in the Nordic pantheon. The monograph-journal describes itself as radical traditionalist, celebrating “the traditional myths, culture and social institutions of pre-Christian, pre-modern Europe. It means to reject the modern, materialist reign of quantity over quality, the absence spiritual values, environmental devastation and overspecialization of urban life and the imperialism of corporate monoculture.” The monograph series as a whole is edited by Joshua Buckley and Michael Moynihan and presents both European and American scholars and writers.

The interview-essay, which also contains a number of black and white photographs, is the first time I have returned to many of the themes discussed in my book, The Well of Remembrance, since its original publication in 1994. Topics we discuss include: the work of Marija Gimbutas, the worldview changes and political upheavals of the 1960s, the role of psychedelics, the meaning of the myths of Odin, C.G. Jung’s views and many others.

The Tyr volume also reprints an essay by my friend the German ethnologist Christian Rätsch on “The Mead of Inspiration” – and what specific plant and fungal preparations might have been involved in that mythic brew.

Other essays in this lavishly illustrated and handsomely produced volume Tyr 4, include: What is Religion? by Alain de Benoist; What is Odinism? by Collin Cleary; Traditional Time-Telling in Old England, and Modern by Nigel Pennick; Garden Dwarves and House Spirits by Claude Lecouteux; Germanic Art in the First Millenium by Stephen Pollington; Finding the Lost Voice of our Germanic Ancestors: An Interview with Benjamin Bagby; On Barbarian Suffering by Steve Harris, and others.

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